Home Preparation - Hercules Movers

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How to Downsize Prior to Moving to a New Home

Downsizing is a major step when moving. It’s not just a change of place, but potentially a major change of lifestyle as well. It means having fewer things to worry about, but also fewer things you might rely on. Perhaps you have so much that you won’t notice losing a few extra items and spare appliances. Whatever the reason you’re downsizing, know that it’s an involved process. It’s less about throwing old things away and understanding what makes something important enough to take with you into a new home.

Here’s a breakdown of the steps you should work through to prepare yourself for the work of downsizing before the move actually occurs:

Start Pretty Early

Time flies when you’re hard at work preparing for a new home. If you know when the move-out date is when all your utilities will be off, when the address will be changed for all your mail and services, plan 3 months ahead, at least. It’s a good idea to give yourself a long window to work with and not wait until the last minute when there’s too much to handle on top of all the physical and mental strain of moving in and out and around. Three months leaves you with plenty of time to think about what you need and take action.

Making Tough Choices

Going through all the things you own can be daunting. You may be surprised to see just how much you’ve been holding onto over the years. There are a few different organizational methods you can use to make the process easier. You can pick one thing every day to throw away until you can’t justify it anymore, or limit your options by only what you can bring in four boxes. For clothes, turn them all one way in your closet, then turn them around once you’ve worn them. Anything you never wore between starting and moving out, donate. Go room by room and determine what the most crucial components of each room are, then leave the rest for removal.

Start Planning Layouts

It’s easier to know what you’ll need when you can tell how it will look in your new space. If you have the dimensions for your new home, plan around them and understand how much you can fit in any given space or series of spaces. Your physical space isn’t all you should plan around. Consider what kind of life you plan on living from now on. A downsize isn’t just reducing what you own, it’s also your neediness, your wants, and your future plans. It’s about living an easier life with less in it, in order to reduce overall stress.

Keep Hard Rules

You want to make sure you don’t make too many exceptions. It’s easy to think that it won’t hurt to just take one thing that isn’t useful or helpful but looks nice. A couple of knick-knacks are fine, but things can get out of hand quickly. Keep an emphasis on decluttering and staying decluttered. Generally, think of the things you may keep, down to these simple criteria: Have you used it in the past six months? If you have, also consider, does it fit in your new home? Keep those items. If you haven’t used it or noticed it in that timeframe, is it at least sentimental and worth keeping for value other than immediate practicality? Keep that. And if it makes you plainly happy, you can keep that. Otherwise, consider giving it away to the family if it still works or is good, donating or selling it if no one wants it, or trash it if there is no further use and no one wants it.

Digitize Paper Goods

If you have a lot of papers and documents that need to be kept, you can either find some way to externally store them or consider digitizing them so they will no longer take up physical space but data space instead. Digital organization and decluttering is an entirely different skill set worth learning. As more and more of the world turn to online infrastructure, they will start requiring digital paperwork more than physical forms and hard copies. While it’s good to stick with formats that are easy to call on and not prone to corruption, it still takes a lot of space to hold onto papers. They’re light by themselves, but a bundle of paper can weigh you down.

Reuse What You Can’t Store

There may be some items or curios you definitely don’t want to part with but may be too complicated or bulky to stay with you in a smaller living space and lifestyle. Collections or art pieces can be especially tricky to consolidate, but it’s not impossible. Consider more creative outlets to keep your more memorable goods. Turn wardrobes into quilts so they can stay with you. Adapt art pieces to fit in new places in your next home, even outdoor art can find a good place indoors to be appreciated. Some items have obvious alternate uses, such as old trunks and chests being reused as general storage or whole dressers to replace the bigger, bulkier ones.

Don’t Be Afraid To Ask For Help

Moving is hard work, and it’s never easy. Just ask any of your friends or family that had to do it. And ask them for help first. Your friends and family members will likely have some insight or input into the things you might want to keep or help you get rid of. They can also be the first outlet for relieving you of your items as they may want them. Play to your strengths and be a guide or just a strong set of arms for others to direct and coordinate to make the move as efficient as possible. You can hire movers to help with the heaviest stuff, such as furniture and major appliances, on moving day to save everyone else the hardest job of all.


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It’s time to move. It’s always something difficult, from packing and relocating to saying goodbye to the neighborhood you’ve gotten used to for so long. What makes it harder is realizing just how much stuff you’ve got, and how much of it you really don’t need – but it’s not junk! So you should take it with you, right? But you already know there’s nowhere to put it in the new place….

These thoughts can rattle around in your head like a box of silverware that hasn’t been properly packed together. Instead of fretting about it, you can hold a Moving Sale to get rid of some of your unwanted, unneeded, or unmoveable items so you can start in a new place with a more manageable inventory of items. It can even help pay back some costs of hiring professional movers to help you get your new home ready. Here’s a quick walkthrough of what goes into a successful moving sale.

1.   Plan Your Inventory

For the next few days of your moving/yard/garage sale, you’ll become the manager of a very low-end store on your own property. So first, you need to figure out what you’ll be selling. Decide, once and for all, what you want to take with you and keep it inside. Everything else should be ready for sale. If it needs to be packed up, hung up, or just dragged out, get it ready.

2.   Plan To Work

If you’ve ever seen a yard sale you must think it’s pretty easy. You just sit in the shade and wait for people to roll by to inspect your goods. It’s not that simple. You’ll need to put prices on everything, every single item, and be willing to negotiate with keen buyers who are looking to get a deal for themselves first and foremost. You’ll be out there all day, for multiple days, just to watch over everything so it doesn’t suddenly turn into a moving-out donation drive instead.

3.   Plan For Weather

Look ahead to see what the weather is going to be like. If you’re lucky, it’ll be sunny and mild so people will be outdoors, walking around as normal who might just happen to cross your street and see what’s going on. You don’t want to have clothes hanging or boxes out in the rain, or in a dangerous heat wave. If you have a garage, you can keep everything in there and let the more weather-durable goods rest outside during the day.

4.   Plan Your Advertisements

A business can’t do business without letting people know that it’s in business. And what you’re running, however temporarily, is a very small business. Send out messages, get friends involved, even make flyers to post in approved public areas if you can. That’ll help get rid of all the extra printer paper you weren’t planning on packing anyway. Just posting a sign in your yard isn’t enough. You want people informed of what you’re doing from one end of your town to the other for maximum potential traffic.

5.   Plan Your Prices

You might be tempted to get a full refund for all the things you bought and never used or forgot about, but that’s just not realistic. Even if you only used that massage gun or blender once, people will assume that it’s as second-hand as anything on eBay is. So you may as well check what people are doing on eBay. Price your goods according to second-hand online stores like eBay. If anyone is curious about how much they should pay, that’s likely what they’ll check before haggling.

6.   Sell Online, Too

There’s no reason not to sell online. In fact, for specialty goods, it’s probably a better idea. Appliances and electronics have a huge market online. Consider the state of your neighborhood. Will the old man down the street really be interested in a slightly refurbished Xbox? The only issue with selling online is time. An item could stay listed for weeks, and by then you will have already moved, so put them up at the moving sale too for a lower price. If it sells, it sells, and you can always deactivate the listing early.

7.   Get Some Help

Moving is already a lot of work, and doing a moving sale is like moving without actually leaving your house. You’ll be arranging and placing all your old items in a new place – the yard, and that takes work. Maybe too much for one or two people to handle. Get the family involved. And your friends. Offer them whatever you can for help, a warm meal, or first pick of the merchandise.

8.   Get Ready Early

You might think that outdoor, home-based moving sales are things of the past, but if you’ve seen one recently then you will figure out why that’s not true. If you advertise properly, people will come. Some make a dedicated effort to go to as many yard sales as they can to hunt for bargains on things. They know you aren’t just pushing your junk out the door for them to collect. The things you sell had value to you once, so they must still have some kind of value to them. Expect some early shoppers to show up as soon as your first day.

9.   Plan For Money

How are people going to be paying for everything? You’re not a real store, you don’t have a credit-card swiper…..But you could. Personal card swipers that integrate with apps on your phone are common place nowadays. They link right up to online payment processors like PayPal, too. They’re great for small businesses, and even though yours is the smallest a business can be, it doesn’t hurt to go digital with money. Not everyone will carry cash, and do you have enough change for everything you listed? Who knows. Maybe someday you’ll need that swiper again. Or, in your next moving sale, you can get a decent price for it.

10.   Everything Must Go

The goal here is to leave nothing behind, not even regrets. At the end of the sale, you might still have stuff left, probably more than you want, but you’ll have made something out of it. As for the rest? If you can’t sell it, and it’s not trash, donate it to a local charity so it can go to people who need it but can’t afford it. You can move out knowing you made your neighborhood a little better than when you left.

 


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A professional moving company is a reliable option when it comes to a house move. With the right company, you will enjoy the peace of mind that stems from knowing they will handle most of the organization and moving. It not only takes lots of stress off your shoulders, but ensures your valuables arrive safe and sound into your new home. However, there are things you need to do to significantly aid the moving process.

Even if you hired a full-service move, you can play a part in speeding up the transition process and reduce the risk of setbacks, damages and other problems. Here are a few things you need to do with your new home before the movers arrive – applying these tips will help you unpack faster and settle into your new home sooner.


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South Amboy NJ, 08879

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Marlboro, NJ 07746

176 Saddle River Ave.
Garfield, NJ 07026